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Wednesday, May 23, 2018

Carefully choose what you believe.

Worth my time

First hand knowledge is extremely rare. Choose your sources carefully as they become your beliefs. 

Steve

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There are many religious views that are not the product of common-sense ways of seeing the world. Consider the story of Adam and Eve, or the virgin birth of Christ, or Muhammad ascending to heaven on a winged horse. These are not the product of innate biases. They are learned, and, more surprisingly, they are learned in a special way.

To come to accept such religious narratives is not like learning that grass is green or that stoves can be hot; it is not like picking up stereotypes or customs or social rules. Instead, these narratives are acquired through the testimony of others, from parents or peers or religious authorities. Accepting them requires a leap of faith, but not a theological leap of faith. Rather, a leap in the mundane sense that you must trust the people who are testifying to their truth.

Many religious narratives are believed without even being understood. People will often assert religious claims with confidence—there exists a God, he listens to my prayers, I will go to Heaven when I die—but with little understanding, or even interest, in the details. 

...
People defer to authorities not just to the truth of the religious beliefs, but their meaning as well. 

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None of this is special to religion. Researchers have studied those who have strong opinions about political issues and found that they often literally don’t know what they are talking about. 

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But much of what’s in our heads are credences, not beliefs we can justify—and there’s nothing wrong with this. Life is too brief; there is too much to know and not enough time. We need epistemological shortcuts.
(Ways of acquiring knowledge)

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I believe that global warming is a serious problem and that vaccines do not cause autism, but this is not because I have studied these issues myself.

It is because I trust the scientists.

Most of those who insist that the Earth is 6000 years old and that global warming is a liberal fraud and that vaccines destroy children’s brains would also be at a loss to defend these views. Like me, they defer, just to different authorities.

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This equivalence might lead to a relativist conclusion—you have your faith; I have mine. You believe weird things on faith (virgin birth, winged horse); I believe weird things on faith (invisible particles, Big Bang), and neither of us fully understands what we’re really talking about. But there is a critical difference. Some sorts of deference are better than others.

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Science is not just one “faith community” among many. It has earned its epistemological stripes. And when the stakes are high, as they are with climate change and vaccines, we should appreciate its special status.

https://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2015/11/why-scientific-faith-isnt-the-same-as-religious-faith/417357/

Wednesday, February 07, 2018

Thursday, January 25, 2018

Language comparative study word lists

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swadesh_list

Friday, December 22, 2017

UBI

https://youtu.be/A2aBKnr3Ep4

Thursday, December 21, 2017

Millenial analysis

https://youtu.be/As8XkJNaHbs

Eutherium contract negociations without judges

Ethereum allows people to safely interact trustlessly by entering into neutrally enforceable agreements in a completely peer-to-peer fashion. Because of these properties, decentralized applications such as smart legal contracts would be a good candidate to be developed on this platform.

https://blog.jonajo.com/posts/can-ethereum-blockchain-power-smart-legal-contracts/

Monday, November 20, 2017

2 weeks witout intervention!

The driverless cars are simply so safe that "safety drivers" have become useless, Godsmark says. The latest published figures, now likely out of date, show humans need to intervene behind the wheel of an autonomous vehicle every 8,000 kilometres.

http://www.cbc.ca/1.4403057

Thursday, October 05, 2017

Tuesday, September 26, 2017

Living outside the tribe

http://livelighter.org/5-healthy-ways-to-break-free-from-tribal-thinking/

A basic misunderstanding on the nature of tribalism in various cultures maybe at the root of our confusion about first nations... Steve

... 
treaties with some Native American societies in the West.  It was naively assumed by the federal government that when "spokesmen" for a band agreed to a treaty that it legally bound all members of their society to its terms.  From the perspective of the band members, it really only obligated those specific individuals who agreed to the treaty.  If others in the band failed to follow the terms of the agreement, the federal government assumed that they were going back on a legal agreement.  This cultural misunderstanding on both sides was the consequence of having radically different kinds of political systems as well as profound ethnocentrism.
http://anthro.palomar.edu/political/pol_2.htm


Monday, September 11, 2017